Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship

holy places, ceremonies, pilgrimage by Amikam Elad

Publisher: E.J. Brill in Leiden, New York

Written in English
Cover of: Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship | Amikam Elad
Published: Pages: 196 Downloads: 807
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Places:

  • Jerusalem

Subjects:

  • Islamic shrines -- Jerusalem -- History.,
  • Islam -- Jerusalem -- History.,
  • Jerusalem -- History.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [174]-186) and index.

Statementby Amikam Elad.
SeriesIslamic history and civilization., v. 8
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBP187.55.P19 J414 1995
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 196 p. :
Number of Pages196
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1089649M
ISBN 109004100105
LC Control Number94013753

The Passions of Medieval Jerusalem. from sixty lenders in more than a dozen countries, express the Jewish, Islamic, and Christian cultures of the time, the three great Abrahamic faiths sharing Author: Peter Schjeldahl. Following the Islamic conquest of Jerusalem in the early 7th century, the new rulers of the city almost immediately began a series of architectural, administrative, and urban development projects. I will be focusing specifically on several projects undertaken during the Umayyad dynasty. So far, there have been extensive discussions locating the ways in which the Umayyads made political and Author: Michael W. Zhang. Key concepts: Medieval Muslim Societies Our mission is to provide a free, world-class education to anyone, anywhere. Khan Academy is a (c)(3) nonprofit organization. From the time of its birth in Mecca in the 7th century C.E., Islam and the Islamic world rapidly expanded outward, extending to Spain and West Africa in the west, and to Central Asia and the Indian Subcontinent in the east. An examination of the daily life in these Islamic regions provides insight into a civilized, powerful, and economically stable culture, where large metropolitan centers /5(2).

This includes Jerusalem and is considered sacred by Jews, Christians, and Muslims. The Holy Land At this meeting in France, Pope Urban called on Christians to take up arms, aid the Byzantine Empire, and recapture Jerusalem from Muslim control.   Introduction. The history of Jerusalem during the Middle Ages is generally one of decline; beginning as a major city in the Byzantine Empire, Jerusalem prospered during the early centuries of Muslim control (–), but under the rule of the Fatimid caliphate (late 10th to 11th centuries) its population declined from about , to less than half that number by the time of the Christian. Christianity and Islam have more in common than most people know — they are both monotheistic Abrahamic religions, and Jesus Christ is an important, revered figure in both religions.. Followers of Christianity — called Christians — believe in the Holy Trinity, and that Christ, the son of God, walked the earth as the incarnate form of God ("the Father"). Muslim responses to the Crusades have been a focus of modern scholarship in both Crusades studies and medieval Islamic history over the last decade or so. This important aspect of the Crusades had been largely, if not entirely, ignored by Western scholars owing to .

- [Narrator] As we've talked about in multiple videos, Christianity is a religion that grew out of the fringes of the Roman Empire. It starts as a Jewish sect in Judea and Galilee with the teachings of Jesus and his early ministry. But it's important to keep in mind that at the time of Jesus's crucifixion, around 30 C.E., he only had, at most.

Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship by Amikam Elad Download PDF EPUB FB2

Amikam Elad, Ph.D. () in Medieval Islamic History, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, is a senior lecturer at the department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University. He has published extensively on a vast range of topics relating to early Islamic history, in particular the early Abbasid period and on the history of Palestine during the medieval Islamic period.5/5(1).

Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship treats of the holy sites of the Muslims in Jerusalem and the ceremonies and pilgrimage to these places during the early Muslim period. It is based primarily on primary Arabic sources, some of which have been used for the first time.3/5(1).

Amikam Elad, Ph.D. () in Medieval Islamic History, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, is a senior lecturer at the department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University.

He has published extensively on a vast range of topics relating to early Islamic history, in particular the early Abb sid period and on the history of Palestine during the medieval Islamic period.3/5(2).

Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship: Holy Places, Ceremonies, Pilgrimage (Islamic History and Civilization: Studies and Texts, Vol 8) Amikam Elad This text covers the holy sites of the Muslims in Jerusalem and the cermonies and pilgrimages to these places during the early Muslim period.

"Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship" published on 01 Jan by Brill. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship: Holy Places, Ceremonies, Pilgrimage. By Amikam Elad. Amikam Elad, Ph.D. () in Medieval Islamic History, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, is a senior lecturer at the department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University.

He has published extensively on a vast range of topics relating to early Islamic history, in particular the early ‘Abbāsid period and on the history of Palestine during the medieval Islamic by:   Medieval Jerusalem And Islamic Worship Holy Places, Ceremonies, Pilgrimage (Islamic History And Civilization) Item Preview.

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are strongly tied to the ancient city, and followers of each of these religions have controlled all or part of the city over the past few thousand years. In 1, Medieval Jerusalem examines an old question that has recently surfaced and given rise to spirited discussion among Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship book historians and archeologists: what role did a city revered for its holiness play in the unfolding politics of the early Islamic period.

Was there an historic moment when the city, holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims, may have been considered as the administrative center Author: Jacob Lassner. Description: "Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship" provides fascinating new information about the Muslim holy places in Jerusalem, rituals and pilgrimage to these places during the early Muslim period.

It is based primarily on early primary Arabic sources, many of which have not yet been published. Jerusalem in Medieval Islamic Tradition. This book presents a study of the cult of saints among Muslims and Jews in medieval Syria and the Near East.

Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship treats of the holy sites of the Muslims in Jerusalem and the ceremonies and pilgrimage to these places during the early Muslim period. It is based primarily on primary Arabic sources, some of which have been used for the first time.

Islamic Expansion and Empire. Conquests. 2ND W.N. Arafat: "New Light on the Story of the Banu Qurayza and the Jews of Medina", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, (), [At ] 2ND The Battle of Badr, CE [At Internet Archive, from ]; Al-Baladhuri: The Battle of The Yarmuk ( CE) and After.

See also Grabar, Jerusalem: Constructing the Study of Islamic Art, pp. –14 and Colby (). 16 Elad, Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship, pp. 31–2.

17 Grabar, Jerusalem: Constructing the Study of Islamic Art, p. 18 Elad, Medieval Jerusalem, pp. 47–8. 19 A recent exposition on the medieval narratives of the Night Journey. Issuu is a digital publishing platform that makes it simple to publish magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online.

Ihcst elad medieval jerusalem and islamic worship holy. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship: Holy Places, Ceremonies, Pilgrimage (Islamic History and Civilization) Library Binding – 19 Mar. by Amikam Elad (Author) › Visit Amazon's Amikam Elad Page.

search results for this author. Amikam Elad (Author) See all Author: Amikam Elad. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship treats of the holy sites of the Muslims in Jerusalem and the ceremonies and pilgrimage to these places during the early Muslim period.

It is based principally on primary Arabic sources, some of which have been used for the first time. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship provides fascinating new information about the Muslim holy places in Jerusalem, rituals and pilgrimage to these places during the early Muslim period.

It is based primarily on early primary Arabic sources, many of which have not yet been published. Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship: holy places, ceremonies, pilgrimage / by Amikam Elad. First Islamization of Jerusalem under the Caliphates. In CE, the Islamic Caliphate extended its dominion to Jerusalem.

With the Arab conquest of the region, Jews were allowed back into the city. While the majority population of Jerusalem during the time of Arab conquest was Christian, the majority of the Palestine population of aboutinhabitants, was still Jewish.

Medieval Jerusalem: Forging an Islamic City in Spaces Sacred to Christians and Jews. In this Book. Additional Information. Medieval Jerusalem: Forging an Islamic City in Spaces Sacred to Christians and Jews Jerusalem in the Imagination of the Prophet and His Companions; pp.

; Download Chapter 3. The “Furthest Place of Worship Author: Jacob Lassner. Dāwūd” could refer to at least four different sites in Jerusalem (see Amikam Elad, Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic Worship: Holy Places, Ceremonies, Pilgrimage (Leiden, ), –38), but the identification with David’s Tower is, in this context, unambiguous.

Jerusalem and Islam The third most sacred city in Islam is Jerusalem, which was the original qibla (direction of prayer) before it was changed to Mecca.

Jerusalem is revered because, in Muslim tradition, Muhammad miraculously traveled to Jerusalem by. The Near and Middle East - Amikam Elad: Medieval Jerusalem and Islamic worship: holy places, ceremonies, pilgrimage. (Islamic History and Civilization. Studies and Author: C. Edmund Bosworth.

Book Description: Medieval Jerusalemexamines an old question that has recently surfaced and given rise to spirited discussion among Islamic historians and archeologists: what role did a city revered for its holiness play in the unfolding politics of the early Islamic period?Was there an historic moment when the city, holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims, may have been considered as the.

BROTHERHOOD OF VICE: SODOMY, ISLAM, AND THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR Mark Steckler On Friday Octomembers of the Order of the Knights Templar in France, under the orders of King Philip IV (d. ), were arrested en Size: KB.

Which of the following was a prominent occurrence in the late 7th century in the Islamic religion?-The Ottoman Caliphate captured the holy city of Jerusalem-Islamic traditions had gained widespread acceptance in Western Europe-There was a split between the Shia and the Sunni factions of Islam. The medieval Islamic world’s view of the west is a mirror of today’s view of Islam by the west: exotic and distant, populated by a fanatical warlike population, slow to develop, economically Author: Missy Sullivan.

Medieval Jerusalem examines an old question that has recently surfaced and given rise to spirited discussion among Islamic historians and archeologists: what role did a city revered for its holiness play in the unfolding politics of the early Islamic period.

Was there an historic moment when the city, holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims, may have been considered as the administrative center. Jerusalem and Judaism. In the book of Deuteronomy (and other places), the Israelites are commanded not to worship at any site except in the place that the Lord “will choose.” After the conquest of Jerusalem, this ‘place’ was aligned with the biblical tradition that Jerusalem sat atop the site known as Mt.

Moriah, the mountain where.The Prophet Muhammad taught his followers that Islam is much more than a private personal matter. Islam attaches no value to rituals that are performed mechanically and have no influence on one's inner life.

This issue was addressed in an incident when Muslims, as well as local Jews and Christians, disputed about the prayer direction being changed from Jerusalem to the Ka'bah (the Sacred.Bibliography: Islam and the Arab World in the Middle Ages and Ottoman Periods This page lists primarily works about Islam and the Arabs prior to modern times.

The main bibliography page links to additional bibliographies of the Arab Middle East, Women, Oil, country bibliographies and other special topics.